Motherhood

How to Raise a Resilient Child

How to Raise a Resilient Child

Your natural instincts will most likely make you want to shield your child from any emotional or physical threat, to make sure they are happy and safe at all times. While it is of course essential to keep your child from harm’s way, a little hardship is not always a bad thing. When they grow up they wont always have you on hand to guide them down the safest path or to fight their battles for them, they will need to learn to do this on their own. Teaching your child to be self-dependent and resilient from a young age will help them to navigate the world when they eventually start to become more independent. An independent school in Hertfordshire has shared the following advice on how to help your child become a more resilient person.

 

Children learn their skills and abilities through play, they will naturally push their boundaries and explore risk taking. It is important not to intervene or mollycoddle as this can lead children to shy away from measured risks in the future, in fact sensible risk taking should be encouraged. Although protecting them from dangerous situations is a must, grazed knees and bruised elbows are a normal part of childhood, they help children realise their limits and teach them to dust themselves off after a minor mishap. Children will inevitably experience some form of difficulty throughout their lives, and this childhood play cements the building blocks for dealing with adversity further down the line. 

 

Build their confidence by encouraging them to tackle manageable challenges independently. This could be as simple as climbing a climbing frame without you waiting underneath to catch them or letting them colour in a colouring book without reminding them to stay within the lines. Any task which gives them an opportunity to conduct themselves independently will teach them that they are capable of achieving things without help. Be sure to encourage their effort in the act of trying, reminding them that success or winning is not the most valuable aspect of the experience. Have them try out new sports or extracurricular activities, they won’t be the best at everything they attempt but they will learn their strengths and weaknesses along the way. When things do go wrong, a lost race or a low score on an exam, praise their effort and encourage them to keep trying. Disappointment is inevitable but learning to be optimistic and try again is the mark of true resilience.